Upcoming Events

Webinars

11/14/17 1:00-2:00pm

"Advancing Spiritual Care with a Spiritual Legacy Intervention for Patients with Brain Cancer"

UAB Pastoral Care Library

The difference between empathy and sympathy

If you know the difference between empathy and sympathy, you are the one who will make the difference in someone’s life.

Watch this fun 150-second video by Brene Brown to learn how.

(Deleting the Ad:  Once the video starts, delete the ad by clicking on the little “x” on the right upper corner of the ad.)

 

Ashes to Go – Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Ashes to Go - Click here for scheduleASH WEDNESDAY — UAB Pastoral Care is sponsoring “Ashes to Go” in the following locations at UAB Medicine on Wednesday, February 10, 2016.

All visitors and employees are welcome to stop by, receive ashes (the sign of the cross with ashes on one’s forehead), and be on your way in less than a minute.  All faith groups and denominations are welcome to participate in Ashes to Go.

Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent, 40 days (not counting Sundays) before Easter when many Christians choose to give up something (sacrifice) or take on a new spiritual practice (service).  It is symbolic of the 40 days Jesus fasted in the desert before his ministry, and a way to prepare for Easter.  Ashes are symbolic of remembering our humility, “Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.”

SCHEDULE – Chaplains will be present to offer ashes to all

  1. North Pavilion, 2nd Floor near elevators – 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
  2. The Kirklin Clinic, 2nd Floor near elevators – 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
  3. UAB Highlands, 1st Floor lobby – 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

For our Catholic guests and employees — Catholic Mass will be held in the Interfaith Chapel, West Pavilion, 1st Floor on Wednesday at 11:00 a.m.

Ashes to Go” is about bringing spirit, belief, and belonging out from behind church doors, and into the places where we go every day. It’s a simple event with deep meaning, drawing on centuries of tradition and worship to provide a contemporary moment of grace.”

All persons are welcome to receive ashes in the busiest pedestrian intersections in the largest hospital in the state of Alabama, and the third largest public hospital in the United States.

Flyers will be shared that has an inclusive prayer with the meaning of Ash Wednesday on it.

UAB Hospital cares for the body, mind, and spirit of all guests and employees, regardless of faith background.  More about Ash Wednesday.

Psalm 51
1 Have mercy on me, O God, according to your steadfast love;
according to your abundant mercy blot out my transgressions.
2 Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity,
and cleanse me from my sin.

3 For I know my transgressions,
and my sin is ever before me.
4 Against you, you alone, have I sinned,
and done what is evil in your sight,
so that you are justified in your sentence
and blameless when you pass judgement.
5 Indeed, I was born guilty,
a sinner when my mother conceived me.

6 You desire truth in the inward being;*
therefore teach me wisdom in my secret heart.
7 Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean;
wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.
8 Let me hear joy and gladness;
let the bones that you have crushed rejoice.
9 Hide your face from my sins,
and blot out all my iniquities.

10 Create in me a clean heart, O God,
and put a new and right* spirit within me.
11 Do not cast me away from your presence,
and do not take your holy spirit from me.
12 Restore to me the joy of your salvation,
and sustain in me a willing* spirit.

13 Then I will teach transgressors your ways,
and sinners will return to you.
14 Deliver me from bloodshed, O God,
O God of my salvation,
and my tongue will sing aloud of your deliverance.

15 O Lord, open my lips,
and my mouth will declare your praise.
16 For you have no delight in sacrifice;
if I were to give a burnt-offering, you would not be pleased.
17 The sacrifice acceptable to God* is a broken spirit;
a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.

Community IS Medicine

Thank you Drexel Rayford for reminding us that community IS the best medicine we dispense at UAB Pastoral Care.

Drexel is leading our Chaplains to develop one Support Team at a time for patients in the hospital, or at the doctor’s office.

This is our new way of doing pastoral care and chaplaincy at UAB Pastoral Care. We work with the community to make sure people have the best medicine possible when they go home.

Read more here:

“Community is Medicine”

The Lighting of the Hanukkah Menorah – UAB Pastoral Care

Staff Chaplain Michael Horwitz

Staff Chaplain Michael Horwitz

Who:  Everyone is invited

What:  Learning about Hannukkah

When:  Monday Dec. 7th, 2015 8:15PM

Where: North Pavilion, Second Floor Atrium

Join Chaplain G. Michael Horwitz for an informal gathering to witness the lighting of the Hanukkah Menorah for the 2nd night of Hanukkah.

This event is open to all employees, guests, families, and patients. The event will have driedels, games, singing, holiday “schtick”, and educational information about the Jewish Festival of Lights, known as Hanukkah.

Click here for Hanukkah Video Michael Horwitz 2015

Hanukkah commemorates the victory of the Maccabees over the armies of King Antiochus Epiphanes IV of Syria in 165 B.C.E.

Legend has it that a small amount of oil, when used to relight the menorah in the Temple, miraculously lasted for 8 days. Hanukkah means “dedication” and marks the rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem following its destruction by the Syrians.

Jews throughout the world celebrate Hanukkah for 8 days, beginning the eve leading into the 25th day of the Hebrew month of Kislev.

This year Hanukkah is observed beginning at sundown Dec. 6th through sundown Dec. 14th.

Hanukkah Celebration

Michael Horwitz

Michael Horwitz

  • Thursday, December 18, 2014
  • 12:30-2:00 pm
  • North Pavilion Atrium

Join Chaplain G. Michael Horwitz for an informal gathering.  This event is open to all employees, guests, families, and patients.  Stop by on your lunch break and say “shalom”, learn about the menorah, and have some fun. The event will have driedels, games, singing, holiday “schtick”, and educational information about the Jewish Festival of Lights, known as Hanukkah.

Hanukkah commenorates the victory of the Maccabees over the armies of King Antiochus Epiphanes IV of Syria in 165 B.C.E. Legend has it that a small amount of oil, when used to relight the menorah in the Temple, miraculously lasted for 8 days. Hanukkah means dedication and marks the rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem following its destruction by the Syrians.  Jews throughout the world celebrate Hanukkah for 8 days, beginning the eve leading into the 25th day of the Hebrew month of Kislev. This year Hanukkah is observed beginning at sundown Dec. 16th through sundown Dec. 24th.

Ashes to Go – Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Ash WednesdayUAB Pastoral Care is sponsoring “Ashes to Go” in the North Pavilion from 1:00-3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 5, 2014.

“Ashes to Go” is about bringing spirit, belief, and belonging out from behind church doors, and into the places where we go every day.  It’s a simple event with deep meaning, drawing on centuries of tradition and worship to provide a contemporary moment of grace.”

All persons are welcome to receive ashes in the busiest pedestrian intersection in the largest hospital in the state of Alabama, and the third largest public hospital in the United States.

Staff Chaplains and local clergy will be present in the large hallways near the food court, Guest Services desk, and main elevators. All visitors and employees are welcome to stop, receive ashes and be on your way in less than a minute.

Cards will be shared that has an inclusive prayer and meaning of Ash Wednesday on it.

UAB Hospital cares for the body, mind, and spirit of all guests and employees.

Psalm 51

1 Ash Wednesday cross on foreheadHave mercy on me, O God, according to your steadfast love;
according to your abundant mercy blot out my transgressions.
2 Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity,
and cleanse me from my sin.

3 For I know my transgressions,
and my sin is ever before me.
4 Against you, you alone, have I sinned,
and done what is evil in your sight,
so that you are justified in your sentence
and blameless when you pass judgement.
5 Indeed, I was born guilty,
a sinner when my mother conceived me.

6 You desire truth in the inward being;*
therefore teach me wisdom in my secret heart.
7 Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean;
wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.
8 Let me hear joy and gladness;
let the bones that you have crushed rejoice.
9 Hide your face from my sins,
and blot out all my iniquities.

10 Create in me a clean heart, O God,
and put a new and right* spirit within me.
11 Do not cast me away from your presence,
and do not take your holy spirit from me.
12 Restore to me the joy of your salvation,
and sustain in me a willing* spirit.

13 Then I will teach transgressors your ways,
and sinners will return to you.
14 Deliver me from bloodshed, O God,
O God of my salvation,
and my tongue will sing aloud of your deliverance.

15 O Lord, open my lips,
and my mouth will declare your praise.
16 For you have no delight in sacrifice;
if I were to give a burnt-offering, you would not be pleased.
17 The sacrifice acceptable to God* is a broken spirit;
a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.

Ordination at UAB Hospital

ordination

It is not every day that a minister is ordained in a public university medical center.

The Rev. Malcolm L. Marler, D.Min., was ordained as a priest in the Episcopal Church at UAB Hospital on Wednesday, January 15th at 4:00 p.m. in the North Pavilion atrium of the hospital.  The public was invited.

Marler has been a Chaplain at UAB for twenty years, presently as the Director of Pastoral Care at UAB since 2009, and at The 1917 Clinic at UAB as a Chaplain from 1994-2009.

The Rt. Rev. John McKee Sloan, the Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Alabama, prefers to ordain new priests in the parish or congregation where he or she will be serving.  Since this is where Marler serves full-time, he asked Malcolm if he could have the service in the hospital.

I thought, well, UAB Hospital is my parish or my church,” said Marler.  “I think of our employees as members of a large congregation, and our patients and families as our guests where we show hospitality.”

“Hospitality is the relationship between the guest and the host, or the act or practice of being hospitable. This includes the reception and entertainment (or comfort making) of guests, visitors, or strangers.” (Wikipedia) Hospitals were originally places of hospitality.

UAB Hospital is a wonderful place where we, as chaplains, meet people where they are regardless of faith background in some of the most challenging times of their lives.  We try to walk alongside persons to remind them they are loved and are not alone.  I  hope it will be an opportunity for others to learn more about the role of chaplaincy (pastoral care) as a member of the interdisciplinary medical team that offers compassion and healing in this place,” Marler said.

Malcolm Marler

Malcolm was first ordained in a different Christian denomination more than 30 years ago.  He and his wife, Mary Bea Sullivan, joined the Episcopal Church in 2008.  Each denomination has its own requirements for ordination of its own clergy.  “We are all on a spiritual journey and this has been a natural journey for me to be ordained in the church where I am now a member even though I have been a clergy person for many years.”  Marler’s father and grandfather were also pastors in Alabama.

The public is invited, and people may come and go during the approximate one hour service.  It will be held on the second floor in the North Pavilion atrium in the busiest corridor of the largest hospital in the state of Alabama.  “It will be among the people, where our ministry happens every day.  I hope persons will stop by and stand or sit, even if for a few moments.”

What:         Ordination of a Priest in the Episcopal Church

Where:      UAB Hospital, North Pavilion Atrium, Second Floor

When:        Wednesday, January 15, 2014, 4:00 p.m.

Who:           Open to the public

Carol Sing & Open House

Tuesday, December 17th

Annual Christmas Carol Sing & Pastoral Care Department Open House

 

Christmas Carols

Christmas Carol Sing

12:00-12:30 p.m. Interfaith Chapel, First Floor, West Pavilion, UAB Hospital

Come and sing your favorite Christmas Carols with us

 

Pastoral Care Department Open House

hotapplecider

12:30-2:00 p.m. First Floor, West Pavilion, UAB Hospital

Enjoy hot apple cider and delicious treats

Everyone Welcome

Thanksgiving Prayer

ThanksgivingBless us O Lord! At this time and during this month of Thanksgiving. For thy gifts which we are about to receive through you.

We thank you for our abilities to care for those in need. We take time out to enjoy each other’s company and be gracious and grateful to you and for what we have in our own lives. 

We give thanks for this food prepared by loving hands and for the gift of being able to gather for this occasion at this season. We ask you to continue to bless our hands for healing others and ourselves. We are blessed to be able to enjoy this meal and are thankful for our families. We pray for our own health and strength to carry on and care for others.

We are appreciative of the freedoms we have in this country and pray for others around the world and on our own shores who are suffering and think of those not able to be with their family or who are alone and have do not have any family.

We ask you to watch over all of your creation, all creatures, and all peoples.

As Psalm 100 states:  Enter into the Lord’s gates with Thanksgiving and into his courts with praise, be thankful unto him and bless his name. For the Lord is Good. AMEN.

 

Chaplain G. Michael Horwitz
UAB Medicine Staff Chaplain

Hanukkah Celebrates Faith

A story of taking a stand to make a difference

by Staff Chaplain G. Michael Horwitz 

Local Television Coverage click here

menorahThis year the eight day celebration of Hanukkah is observed beginning on the evening of Wednesday, November 27th through Wednesday, December 4th.  This means that the first day of Hanukkah coincides with Thanksgiving Day with the first of the menorah lightings the evening before.  This is a rare occurrence which will not happen again for another 70,000 years.  Some are referring to the holidays this year as “Thanksgivukkah.”

Judaism follows a lunar calendar; therefore, Hanukkah and other Jewish holidays occur on different days of the regular calendar each year.  The only constant is the Jewish Sabbath—SHABBAT. The fact that Thanksgiving is as late as it possibly can be this year helps make this possible in the month of November. I will be leading a Hanukkah celebration at UAB Hospital in the North Pavilion Atrium on Monday Dec. 2nd from 11:45-12:15 including a menorah lighting, songs and fun. I hope you will join me.

Hanukkah’s location in the Jewish lunar calendar does lead to its falling in November or December each year.  This proximity to Christmas leads many to think of Hanukkah as a Jewish Christmas BUT it is not.  With the secularization of Christmas, the lure of the holiday seasonal magic is hard to ignore and Jewish families can get sucked into the frenzy.  The tradition of giving presents during Hanukkah is predominantly American.  Hanukkah is actually considered a minor holiday and many don’t know its history or significance, assuming that Jewish people simply light candles and give presents.

Hanukkah Celebration at UAB Hospital for the 5th day of Hanukkah

Monday Dec. 2nd, Noon – 12:30 pm

North Pavilion Atrium, 2nd Floor

Join Chaplain Michael Horwitz for fun, singing, and lighting the Hanukkah menorah and learn about this Jewish holiday.

All are welcome to attend.

While Hanukkah is a favorite holiday for Jewish children and families, it is not just a nice children’s story.  It is instead the story of a bloody battle and a miracle. Hanukkah is not mentioned in Hebrew Scriptures but is found instead in the Apocrypha.  In 167 BCE, Syrian Greeks took over the Temple in Jerusalem, defaced it, and destroyed the Scriptures.  In the Maccabean revolt, led by Judah Maccabee, the Jews recaptured the Temple and had the freedom to worship again.  Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Temple.  At the time of this celebration, only one jar of oil could be found which contained only enough oil to last one night.  Miraculously, the oil lasted for eight nights instead.  Jews focus on the message that even small groups of people can make a big difference.  It is important to stand up for things you believe in, and it is important to stand up for your faith, even if there are people out there who are trying to take it away from you.  The lights are symbols of hope, community and faith.  Yes, there is the story of the desecration of the temple and the miracle of the oil; however, this is NOT the real essence of Hanukkah.  We learn the triumph over a secular world, the freedom to worship and the freedom of religion.  Lighting the candles every night is a symbol, not only of the miracle of the oil, but also a celebration of the victory of a small group of Jews who fought for religious freedom.

The wonderful thing about Hanukkah is that it is the only holiday that does not truly require being in the synagogue together as a community but rather it is meant to be observed as a family at home.  However, there is special liturgy in the daily prayers for Hanukkah that is added to the service.  Most communities also have Hanukkah parties, concerts and dinners in Jewish Community Centers and Synagogues.  Families gather around their dinner tables and light candles in succession each night for eight nights.  The gift-giving and exchanging is a cultural thing. There’s nothing the matter with having fun, and there’s nothing the matter with getting gifts and feeling good about being Jewish. Special foods associated with Hanukkah include latkes (potato pancakes fried in oil), sufganiyot (jelly sugar coated doughnuts) and chocolate candies known as Hanukkah gelt.  Yes, there is much more to Hanukkah than spinning a top known as a dreidel and yes there are many more songs than “I have a little dreidel”.  Hanukkah has a sacred tradition of hundreds of songs and new ones are created each year by cantors and Jewish composers.

Lighting the candles on the menorah every night is something Jewish families and individuals are taught to do in the evening based on the traditions and customs of the holiday.  After dark each night, the candles are to be lit near a window and not blown out and special blessings and songs are sung. Children love to play the dreidel game and often sing songs and make Hanukkah craft projects.  Giving to charity is also a part of Hanukkah.  Like many other holidays, spending time with people you love is the most important aspect of the holiday. Eating meals together during Hanukkah allows families to discuss the Jewish faith and what it means to be Jewish.  Candles on the menorah are generally not lit in the morning at home but are supposed to be lit in the synagogue each morning.  Hanukkah lights can be thought of as “seeing light in times of darkness”.